Wrist Resistance Training Improves Motor Control and Strength, by Chue. E., Kim. Y.S., Hill. G., Kim. Y.H., Kim, C.K., & Shim. J.K., in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (2017).

Abstract: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28759532


Background

The muscles of the forearm provide muscular tension to the long tendons in the fingers. Improving forearm and finger strength can improve a Goalkeepers defensive and offensive ball handling actions and decrease the risk of injury (1).


Objective

To investigate the effects of a 6-week resistance strength-training programme on isometric torque control and isokinetic torque strength of the wrist joint in 19 subjects (24.1 years) randomly assigned to either wrist training or a control of no strength training.

Measurement: Training Protocol: The training group performed wrist strengthening exercises in 6 different positions (flexion, extension, pronation, supination, radial deviation and ulnar deviation) for 3 sessions per week for 6-weeks at 70% of 1RM. A progressive increase in volume was utilised with 3-5 reps for weeks 1-2, 6-8 reps for weeks 3-4 and 8-10 reps for weeks 5-6.


Assessment

  • Isometric torque control was assessed with a six-dimensional torque sensor. First the subject’s maximal voluntary torque was measured in all six directions. A sinusoidal time profile of torque was created (yellow line) and the subjects were required to retrace these profiles (red line) controlling their wrist torque, as can be seen in figure 1. Measurement was the absolute deviation of torque produced over the time series estimating each subject’s accuracy.
  • Maximum isokinetic concentric torque production was measured on a Kin-Com dynamometer at an angular velocity of 60 degrees per second in all 6 directions.

What happened?

Isometric torque control was significantly reduced (root-square-mean error) in comparison to the control group. Significance was achieved after just 2 weeks of strength training and continued to improve through out the intervention.

Maximum isokinetic concentric torque significantly increased in comparison to the control group. Significance was achieved after 4 weeks of strength training and continued to improve through out the intervention.


Conclusion

The resistance-training group showed a significant improvement in wrist motor control and strength.


Practical Application

Based on the results of this paper, wrist motor control and strength can be significantly improved with strength training in a relatively short period of time and therefore should be incorporated into a goalkeepers training programme to improve defensive and offensive actions whilst simultaneously reducing the risk of wrist injury.


References

1. Jaworski, C.A., Krause, M., & Brown, J. (2010). Rehabilitation of the wrist and hand following sports injury. , 61-80.
2. Chu, E., kim.Y.S., Hill, G., Kim, Y.H., Kim, C.K., & Shim, J.K. (2017). Wrist resistance training improves motor control and strength.(Epub ahead of print).

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